Here’s a link to my review of “What May Come: The Taller de Gráfica Popular and the Mexican Political Print” at the Art Institute of Chicago. The Prints & Drawings room at the AIC does brilliant work; I’m still haunted by a gorgeous exhibition on The Artist and The Poet that was there last year. “What May Come” continued the high standard.

Here’s the first paragraph of my review:

Exhibition Catalogue

Exhibition Catalogue

From 1937 until the mid-1950s, the Taller de Gráfica Popular (TGP) workshop produced the most inventive, provocative and topically relevant prints in Mexico. Published as broadsides, posters, books, handbills and portfolios, TGP prints showcased the possibilities of graphic art as a powerful and polemical instrument. Founding members Leopoldo Méndez, Pablo O’Higgins and Luis Arenal stated in their group’s Declaration of Principles that “art must reflect the social reality of the times” but that art “can only truly serve the people if it is of the very highest plastic quality.” The Declaration outlined the TGP’s ambitions to make work collectively of a quality that would engage with contemporary issues and events, “serve the people,” contribute to Mexican culture, oppose reactionary forces and establish solidarity with international progressive movements.